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Food and Drink
August 31, 2010
How To Make Organic Soy Milk
In 10 Basic Steps

Making all-natural organic soy milk without all of those crazy big business additives and whatnot is a lot easier than you think.  And your wallet will jump for joy too.

If you go to the grocery store, you're apt to pay $5.00 to $8.00 per gallon of soy milk!

And if you're too cheap to buy soy milk because it's too expensive, you might think cow's milk is better because it's only $3.00 or so.

But if you make your own soy milk, you can drink it at the low, low price of $1.00 to $2.00 per gallon!

About 1 pound of dried organic soybeans will make around 1 gallon of soy milk.  These soybeans average around a dollar or more per pound.
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Plus! Plus! Plus you'll get the okara (the soybean pulp you'll filter out and not drink).  You can use this okara to make veggie burgers, veggie balls for your pasta, and you can add it to cookies, brownies or bread.

My wife will experiment with this in the future, and I'll make sure to add any of these vegetarian and/or vegan recipes.

OK! Let's get started on how to make organic soy milk in 10 basic steps:


Ingredients

Dried organic soybeans
Water
Optional flavoring (sugar, vanilla, salt, or whatever you want)

Supplies

Bowl for soaking
Blender
Large cheese cloth
Wire mesh strainer (optional)
Cooking pot #1
Bowl for collecting okara (left-over soybean pulp)
Wire mesh spoon
Cooking pot #2
Stirring spoon


Soak about 1/2 pound of dried organic soybeans in your "bowl for soaking."  I've read a few places that it takes about 8-12 hours or so.  You might wanna change the water a few times.



Now you're going to use your "blender."  Add one part beans and 3-3.5 parts water to the blender.  Pulverize them bad boyz for a good 2 minutes or so.



Place your "wire mesh strainer" over or latch it over somehow to your "big cooking pot #1."  Then drape your large cheese cloth over the wire mesh strainer.  Then pour the liquefied contents from the blender over the cheese cloth.



Pick up the cheese cloth by its 4 ends, twist them together, and squeeze out as much of the soy milk as you can.  Then put the okara into your "bowl for collecting okara."



Repeat steps 3 and 4 until your 1/2 pound of soybeans make their magical transformation into soy milk.  Umm, soy milk :)



With your "wire mesh spoon," scoop out the foamy stuff from the top.



Place your wire mesh strainer over your "big cooking pot #2," drape the large cheese cloth over it, and pour all of your soy milk into it.  This will help filter out some of the very fine okara.  Repeat this 3 or 4 times from your big cooking pot #1 to big cooking pot #2.



Cook over medium heat for about 18-20 minutes. At this point you will add your vanilla.  Make sure to keep on eye on your concoction as it might boil over.  Be warned!



After it's cooked, feel free to add your sugar.  I've also read that some people like to add some Kosher salt.



Let it cool and then pour it into your containers.  It should make around 2 quarts.  So if you want to fill up an entire 1 gallon jug, just double the recipe (use 1 pound of dried soybeans).


Here's a quick video on how to make organic soy milk:

Here are some external links:

How To Make Soy Milk At Home
How To Make Soy Milk
Buy 25 Pounds of Dried Soybeans From Amazon
Soy Milk Nutritional Facts

Please leave a comment if you've ever made your own organic soy milk.  Do you have any new ideas to share?

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Tags:

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